The Pope’s Odd Company, The F-35 Boondoggle & The Ghost of Judith Miller: July 22, 2015

NOW LIVE ON WhoWhatWhy Pope, with Green Reforms, Keeps Odd Company By Carmelo Ruiz Will the Pope’s courageous stand on the environment extend to challenging those who hypocritically associate themselves with it? WHO The US military’s Trillion-Dollar Boondoggle Scott Beauchamp takes a hard look at the costly, disastrous F-35 “fighter” jet. Many think “the most expensive weapons Read More

The idea that the majority of domestic (or foreign) acts of terror are carried out by singular individuals or crazy loners may be misguided.

Classic WhoWhatWhy: Only “Lone Wolves” Commit Terror?

The Chattanooga shootings in which nine Marines were gunned down by a 24-year-old shooter is one of a long string of such unnerving events. Early word from law enforcement suggests the attack, like so many others in recent years, is being blamed on a “lone wolf”—someone with no connection to known terrorist or other organizations. The authorities almost always assure us that such incidents are isolated, carried out by individuals who are either mentally ill or irrationally hostile to “our way of life.” Back in 2012, WhoWhatWhy Editor-in-Chief Russ Baker questioned this analysis. Examining the larger historical role such violence has played, Baker shows how certain incidents—including “false flag” attacks instigated by governments but blamed on dissidents—have radically transformed societies. His article is as relevant today as ever.

Drone Pilot Payday, A Freakishly Hot Planet & The Loch Ness Catfish: July 17, 2015

NOW LIVE ON WhoWhatWhy RadioWhoWhatWhy: Should We All Become Whistleblowers? By Jeff Schechtman In his work on leadership for both government and corporations, Ira Chaleff has become something of an expert on followers. What he’s found—and what he argues in his book Intelligent Disobedience and in his conversation with WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman—is that we have to learn Read More

Examples of civil disobedience throughout history have lessons that complying with orders may not always be the best method. Photo credit: Ben Schumin. Licensed via Wikimedia Commons

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Should We All Become Whistleblowers?

In his work on leadership for both government and corporations, Ira Chaleff has become something of an expert on followers. What he’s found—and what he argues in his book Intelligent Disobedience and in his conversation with WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman—is that we have to learn not to be so quick to follow orders and accept authority.

Chaleff explores how a remarkable range of wrongdoing of all magnitudes—from financial fraud to war crimes, and even, surprisingly, sexual misconduct—can to some degree trace back to the compromised moral compass of those too quick to comply with orders. While we may not all have it in us to become whistleblowers, says Chaleff, we can all stand to be a bit more disobedient—when it is warranted.

Chicago’s Teen Prisoners, ‘Insane’ Arctic Drilling & Pluto’s Big Surprises‏: July 16, 2015

NOW LIVE ON WhoWhatWhy WhoWhatWhy Investigation Shows Broke Teens Rot in Chicago Jails for Years Awaiting Trials By Ralph Lopez In response to a WhoWhatWhy Freedom of Information Act request, Chicago officials admitted that many teens who are unable to make bail sit in the city’s jails, sometimes for years, before their cases go to Read More

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Republicans Dominate States with Poor Democratic Health, Study Finds

A new study shows that there is a wide gap between states when it comes to providing access to the ballot box for their citizens. States won by President Barack Obama generally performed much better with regard to ballot box access while those won by Mitt Romney in the last presidential election did very poorly.

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Tsarnaev Faces More Charges: in case he gets off?

Middlesex County District Attorney Marian T. Ryan wants Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to stand trial for the murder of MIT cop Sean Collier and the shootout in Watertown, Massachusetts. According to experts, individuals charged with federal capital crimes are almost never subsequently charged with local crimes. Does DA Ryan think the federal charges might not stick upon appeal?

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