Left: Bronx D.A. Robert T. Johnson.  Right: Kalief Browder. Photo credits: Bronx District Attorney's Office / The View (screen capture) / YouTube

Youth, Wrongfully Jailed for Years, Kills Self—Who’s Responsible?

Sixteen-year-old Kalief Browder spent three years in jail without a trial before the charges were dropped—including more than two years in solitary. His experience left him a broken young man. Before he killed himself, he attempted to expose how authorities employed extraordinary pressure to compel confessions of guilt.

Greece’s Defiance, China’s Crash & The Race for the Arctic‏: July 6, 2015

NOW LIVE ON WhoWhatWhy An All-American Independence Day Primary By DonkeyHotey, Klaus Marre and Maria Adelmann If three’s a crowd, then 19’s a party. WHO Angela’s Ashes: How Merkel Failed Greece and Europe On Sunday, the Greeks sent a resounding message to the Eurozone’s leadership by overwhelmingly voting “No” on the bailout referendum. But it’s Read More

The DOJ’s report on what happened in Ferguson is as much the story of race in 21st century America as it is about what transpired in Missouri. Photo credit: Wikimedia Foundation

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Finally, a Meaningful Report on Ferguson, MO

WhoWhatWhy podcaster Jeff Schechtman gets the lowdown on the federal investigation into the death of Michael Brown at the hands of a policeman in Ferguson, Missouri. What was that really about? Was there more to it than an isolated event? In short, yes. Find out in this interview with an NAACP official what systemic issues played a role in generating the deep anger in Ferguson—and throughout the country.

Above, some of the millions of people who have fled Syria.  Photo credit: The UN Refugee Agency / G. Gubaeva

Book Excerpt: “Syria Burning”

If you want to know the who, what, why of how things got so bad in the Syria (and, in some ways, the rest of the Middle East)—read this excerpt from Syria Burning by Charles Glass, a book so beautifully written you will hardly know you are reading. It is more like seeing.

Published by OR Books, New York and London, 2015.

Atomic Secrets, Kamikaze Drones & Killer Cops: June 30, 2015

NOW LIVE ON WhoWhatWhy Last Secret of the Atom Bomb By Paul DeRienzo The search for a dirty-bomb in New York City has uncovered a history of radioactive contamination… and a lingering mystery from the Manhattan Project. WHO American Workers are Burned Out and Overworked MarketWatch is calling it “the 21st Century Paradox.” More than half Read More

A lingering Manhattan Project mystery is still buried at New York’s Great Kill Park. Photo credit:  National Park Service

Last Secret of the Atom Bomb

The search for a dirty-bomb in New York City has uncovered a history of radioactive contamination… and a lingering mystery from the Manhattan Project.

Dark Money, Oily Games & The Other Iran: June 29, 2015

NOW LIVE ON WhoWhatWhy Paid Not to Drill? Not So Fast By Carmelo Ruiz In 2010, Ecuador’s Rafael Correa became the first national leader in the world to rule out drilling for oil in a major petroleum field for ecological reasons. Less than five years later, however, he has backtracked on his promise, and the Read More

Congress recently passed a new bill that will ensure that “dark money” in elections will remain shrouded in secrecy.

Keeping Dark Money in the Shadows

With the Supreme Court knocking down regulations with a wrecking ball, the FEC out of commission, and an election heating up that will likely redefine the term “big money,” there are few avenues left for regulation of American elections. And now, Congress is set to close one off.On June 17, the House Appropriations Committee passed Read More

Ecuadorian president Rafael Correa has worked very hard to cultivate an international public image as defender of the rainforest. But several local civil society and environmental organizations beg to differ. Photo Credit: Cancillería del Ecuador  / Flickr

Paid Not to Drill? Not So Fast

In 2010, Ecuador’s Rafael Correa became the first national leader in the world to rule out drilling for oil in a major petroleum field for ecological reasons. Less than five years later, however, he has backtracked on his promise, and the future of the environmentally important Yasuni National Park is up in the air, as the debate rages on.

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