Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cats

Wild tigers have disappeared from 90 percent of their historic range, and their population stands at a tiny fraction of a century ago. WhoWhatWhy science contributor Sharon Guynup collaborated with National Geographic photographer Steve Winter to raise an alarm about the state of this imperiled species in Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cats (National Geographic Books).

WhoVideo: Fracking…NOT the Gas Industry’s Version (Second Installment)

Here’s another in a series of videos—providing a view of fracking quite different from that of the gas industry, with its expensive campaign of sunny ads.

Radioactive Eye Glasses…Silverware…Zippers…Hip Joints… Anyone?

Every ten years or so, the nuclear establishment trots out a proposal to offload some of its so-called low-level waste—radioactive metals, concrete, soil, plastics, and other materials—onto the public. In the past, this idea was met with outrage and was stopped. But as the nation’s nuclear garbage pile continues to grow, the pressure to release some of it into commerce—and thus our daily lives—mounts.

Can a Small Community Throw a Monkey Wrench into the Global Fracking Machine?

What do you do when you don’t trust the state or federal government to protect your community from a powerful industry that you believe threatens your health, your quality of life, and your financial future? One option: Make what the industry does a crime. Here, we look at one small community that is taking a stand—and hoping a symbolic step becomes a catalyst for bigger things.

Documentaries We Like: Chasing Ice

Friends don’t let friends continue to believe there’s no climate change when they could simply show them Chasing Ice. This is not only the most powerful visual evidence of global catastrophe, it’s also one of the most disarmingly beautiful and riveting films you may ever see. Here’s a preview: opens around the US in November.