Muslim American
President Donald Trump's immigration executive order bans seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for 90 days and suspends the admission of refugees for 120 days generates chaos and confusion worldwide. About this photo: Taken on January 28th, 2017. Photo credit: Geoff Livingston / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

PICKS are stories from many sources, selected by our editors or recommended by our readers because they are important, surprising, troubling, enlightening, inspiring, or amusing. They appear on our site and in our daily newsletter. Please send suggested articles, videos, podcasts, etc. to picks@whowhatwhy.org.

Ron Paul: Economic Collapse Inevitable, Trump Can’t Stop It (Jeff C.)

In a video statement on his personal website, the former Congressman and presidential candidate says an unsustainable debt bubble is soon to pop, and Trump will be unfairly blamed for it. To be clear, he’s been saying this for a few years now.

The Phrase Putin Never Uses About Terrorism (Trevin)

Like Trump, the Russian president loves to talk tough on terrorism. But unlike his American counterpart, he is careful not to conflate Islam with terrorism. And for the media to do so is a prosecutable offense.

House Republicans Take Aim at Obama Regulations (Dan)

Mostly aimed at environmental rules, Republicans are using the Congressional Review Act to quickly trash so-called “job killing” regulations implemented by the last administration.

Israel to Take in 100 Syrian Orphans (Milicent)

In a decision applauded by both right and left wing citizens, the Israeli government will let in 100 Syrian children, orphaned during their country’s civil war. In four years, the children will be eligible to become permanent residents. And if, in the future, their first-degree relatives are found, they, too, may be granted Israeli residency.

Republicans to ‘Fix’ Rather Than ‘Repeal’ Obamacare? Definitely Maybe (Dan)

Republicans are worrying that finding a replacement that wouldn’t lead to a firestorm is near impossible. Some high-profile lawmakers are now considering a fix rather than a total repeal of the problem.