One year ago today, the U.S. Army completed an investigation and a comprehensive legal review concerning Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The matter was forwarded to a General Courts Martial Convening Authority. This ultimately lead to Bergdahl being charged with one count of desertion and one count of misbehavior before the enemy. U.S. Army Forces Command has now scheduled Bergdahl to be arraigned Dec. 22 at Fort Bragg. The new season of the Serial podcast deals with the Bergdahl story. Photo credit: Global Panorama / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

PICKS are stories from many sources, selected by our editors or recommended by our readers because they are important, surprising, troubling, enlightening, inspiring, or amusing. They appear on our site and in our daily newsletter. Please send suggested articles, videos, podcasts, etc. to picks@whowhatwhy.org

If the US Were a Person, It Would Be a Paranoid Schizophrenic (Klaus)

Americans live in a world of perceived enemies, none of which pose a real threat to the nation or its people.

Home of the World’s First Full-Sized Nuclear Reactor Becomes a Tourist Attraction. (Ben)

The nation’s most polluted nuclear weapons production site is now its newest national park and thousands of people are expected next year to tour it.

Are US Academics Who Cite WikiLeaks Blackballed? (Trevin)

Wikileaks puts American scholars in an extremely awkward position, highlighting academia’s bias toward “official positions” on matters of foreign policy.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX Steps Closer to Opening Up Space Travel to the Masses. (Ben)

The historic landing of the Falcon 9 rocket is the darling of the commercial space industry.

Banksy’s Hard-Hitting Christmas Card Goes Viral Again (Trevin)

The street artist’s classic Christmas card depicts Joseph and Mary “crossing the desert on their way to Bethlehem” being “blocked by the infamous apartheid wall that separates Israel from Palestine and the West Bank.”

Technology Helps Whale Photographer Capture Life-Size Images (Trevin)

“Superior cameras, lenses and hard drives help Bryant Austin take high-resolution close-ups and create one-to-one composites.”