Republican Elephant, Third-term Panic
Today is the birthday of President Ulysses S. Grant. He was born April 27, 1822. This cartoon, by Thomas Nast, is considered the first important use of an elephant to symbolize the Republican party. The cartoon was published in Harper's Weekly on November 7, 1874. It depicts the "The Third-term Panic" taking place over the possibility of Grant running for a third term as President of the United States.  Photo Credit: Harper's Weekly / Library of Congress

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