RadioWhoWhatWhy: Should We All Become Whistleblowers?

Reading Time: < 1 minute In his work on leadership for both government and corporations, Ira Chaleff has become something of an expert on followers. What he’s found—and what he argues in his book Intelligent Disobedience and in his conversation with WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman—is that we have to learn not to be so quick to follow orders and accept authority.

Chaleff explores how a remarkable range of wrongdoing of all magnitudes—from financial fraud to war crimes, and even, surprisingly, sexual misconduct—can to some degree trace back to the compromised moral compass of those too quick to comply with orders. While we may not all have it in us to become whistleblowers, says Chaleff, we can all stand to be a bit more disobedient—when it is warranted.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Fanning the Flames of Syria

Reading Time: < 1 minute Just how bad is the situation in Syria? Four million Syrians have fled the country in the past four years as its cities smolder and civil war rages on. Strategic dysfunction on the part of the international community, led by the US, continued airstrikes, and growing violence perpetrated by the Islamic State are definitely part of the story that led to Syria’s descent into chaos. RadioWhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman sits down with Charles Glass, author of Syria Burning, to learn the rest of it.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Finally, a Meaningful Report on Ferguson, MO

Reading Time: < 1 minute WhoWhatWhy podcaster Jeff Schechtman gets the lowdown on the federal investigation into the death of Michael Brown at the hands of a policeman in Ferguson, Missouri. What was that really about? Was there more to it than an isolated event? In short, yes. Find out in this interview with an NAACP official what systemic issues played a role in generating the deep anger in Ferguson—and throughout the country.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Michael Hastings Mystery Death 2nd Anniversary—Late Journalist Muses on Presidential Races

Reading Time: < 1 minute June 18, 2015 is the two-year anniversary of the mysterious death of investigative journalist Michael Hastings. The car crash that took his life was quickly dismissed at the time as the consequence of some inherent recklessness on the part of the victim. An intrepid reporter, Hastings did indeed cover some controversial topics, but was he really a wild man responsible for his fiery demise? Here, we present an interview with a very different fellow, a thoughtful and likable person, on a more prosaic but timely topic: ways to view a presidential campaign.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: The Future of Outsourced Warfare

Reading Time: < 1 minute Blackwater may have become a symbol of all that can go wrong when government contractors outnumber trained military personnel, but what really happened in the killing fields of Iraq and Afghanistan? WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman sits down with Blackwater founder Erik Prince to discuss the history and future of “outsourced” warfare.

The Whistleblower’s Dilemma: Loyalty vs. Moral Obligation

Reading Time: < 1 minute Whistleblowers are often ostracized for their willingness to speak out against corruption and unchecked power. What is it in human nature that’s so scared of transparency and truth? RadioWhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman speaks with former whistleblower Wendy Addison, recognized for bringing attention to massive corruption at a major South African company and now outspoken supporter of whistleblowers worldwide.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Police Becoming Sixth Branch of US Military?

Reading Time: < 1 minute Is President Obama’s recently announced order seeking to reverse the dramatic over-arming of police forces nationwide too little, too late? We all saw—in Baltimore, in Ferguson, in Boston—how civilian law enforcement has turned into a virtual sixth branch of the military. Where is this going? Our guest, author of a new book on the topic, shares his research.