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New Dulles, CIA, JFK Revelations

Reading Time: 1 minute A new book on the CIA’s most powerful director, Allen Dulles, will be out next week. WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman interviews author David Talbot about his many discoveries. These include World War II and Cold War secrets and crucial new information relating to the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Podcast.

The Pentagon’s Brain

Reading Time: 2 minutes In her last work, Annie Jacobsen gave us a look at Area 51. Now she talks to WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman about the trove of government secrets connected to DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency. That’s the secret military R&D labs that gave us the Internet, Agent Orange, drones, and advanced research into human cloning.

Bring Back the Good Old Paper Ballot

Reading Time: 1 minute Despite technological advances in nearly all areas of life, our elections are still safest when paper ballots are used, the distinguished cybersecurity scholar Jonathan Katz tells WhoWhatWhy. In our weekly podcast, he points out the vulnerabilities of all other types of voting and makes the case against Internet voting at this time.

The Hidden Truth About Mass Incarceration

Reading Time: 2 minutes Everywhere you turn, these days, it seems they’re talking about “mass incarceration.” But count on this site for a fresh perspective. In this podcast, a former member of the Symbionese Liberation Army, who spent time in prison for a 1975 bank robbery and is now a professor at the University of Illinois, talks to WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman about how prison has become a panacea for a wide range of our social ills. And why the 1980s ushered in “the most extensive campaign of prison building and incarceration in modern history.”

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Peter Dale Scott Explains the Secret Cheney Operation on 9/11

Reading Time: 1 minute 9/11 was a seminal day in US history, but, as noted author and historian Peter Dale Scott tells WhoWhatWhy, the true significance of what happened goes far beyond what meets the eye. In this podcast, Scott focuses in particular on the implementation of a secret “Continuity of Government” plan that had been decades in the making. Consequently, he argues, there has been “a permanent change to the United States” that permeates the lives of all Americans. The result, according to Scott, has been the suspension of Constitutional rights and the transformation of America in ways that we are still living with today.

The Cost of a Broken Juvenile Justice System in America

Reading Time: 1 minute One in three American young people will be arrested or taken into custody by the time they are 23. A few of these will be as young as ten.

Many will be locked in detention centers under conditions that run counter to everything we know about rehabilitation — indeed, about what constitutes a civilized society.

But what is the right way to lock up a youth? Journalist Nell Bernstein tells WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman that there is no right way. The very act of separation from society in prison-like conditions denies them the most essential requirement of their growth — positive relationships with caring adults.

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Could Google Search Destroy Free and Fair Elections?

Reading Time: 1 minute America’s next President might be put in office by Google. Either by the natural “trending” of the Google search algorithm — or by the invisible hand of a Google executive, manipulating the Search Engine. A new scientific study, by RadioWhoWhatWhy podcast guest Robert Epstein, clearly shows that the rankings in Google search results directly affect our voting behavior.

PODCAST: Trump’s Dead Wrong About Immigration

Reading Time: 1 minute PODCAST: Does Donald Trump know what he’s talking about when it comes to immigration? Not according to new findings. A report issued by the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey School of Public Policy, reveals a startling decline—by more than half—in the number of immigrants coming from Mexico since the early to mid–2000’s. The principal author of that report, Rogelio Saenz, Dean of the University of Texas at San Antonio College of Public Policy, talks to WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman.

Podcast: Russ Baker on the Bushes–Past, Present and Future

Reading Time: 1 minute WhoWhatWhy’s Russ Baker returns to Denver’s KNUS (July 24). Tune in to this wide-ranging interview with Peter Boyles to hear Russ go deep on the Bush family’s true impact, the folly of wars sold under false pretenses, the family’s business practices, the Military-Industrial Complex and Homeland Security Complex, and general dastardliness of our elites and media. Full of surprises.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Should We All Become Whistleblowers?

Reading Time: 1 minute In his work on leadership for both government and corporations, Ira Chaleff has become something of an expert on followers. What he’s found—and what he argues in his book Intelligent Disobedience and in his conversation with WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman—is that we have to learn not to be so quick to follow orders and accept authority.

Chaleff explores how a remarkable range of wrongdoing of all magnitudes—from financial fraud to war crimes, and even, surprisingly, sexual misconduct—can to some degree trace back to the compromised moral compass of those too quick to comply with orders. While we may not all have it in us to become whistleblowers, says Chaleff, we can all stand to be a bit more disobedient—when it is warranted.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Fanning the Flames of Syria

Reading Time: 1 minute Just how bad is the situation in Syria? Four million Syrians have fled the country in the past four years as its cities smolder and civil war rages on. Strategic dysfunction on the part of the international community, led by the US, continued airstrikes, and growing violence perpetrated by the Islamic State are definitely part of the story that led to Syria’s descent into chaos. RadioWhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman sits down with Charles Glass, author of Syria Burning, to learn the rest of it.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Finally, a Meaningful Report on Ferguson, MO

Reading Time: 1 minute WhoWhatWhy podcaster Jeff Schechtman gets the lowdown on the federal investigation into the death of Michael Brown at the hands of a policeman in Ferguson, Missouri. What was that really about? Was there more to it than an isolated event? In short, yes. Find out in this interview with an NAACP official what systemic issues played a role in generating the deep anger in Ferguson—and throughout the country.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: Michael Hastings Mystery Death 2nd Anniversary—Late Journalist Muses on Presidential Races

Reading Time: 1 minute June 18, 2015 is the two-year anniversary of the mysterious death of investigative journalist Michael Hastings. The car crash that took his life was quickly dismissed at the time as the consequence of some inherent recklessness on the part of the victim. An intrepid reporter, Hastings did indeed cover some controversial topics, but was he really a wild man responsible for his fiery demise? Here, we present an interview with a very different fellow, a thoughtful and likable person, on a more prosaic but timely topic: ways to view a presidential campaign.

RadioWhoWhatWhy: The Future of Outsourced Warfare

Reading Time: 1 minute Blackwater may have become a symbol of all that can go wrong when government contractors outnumber trained military personnel, but what really happened in the killing fields of Iraq and Afghanistan? WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman sits down with Blackwater founder Erik Prince to discuss the history and future of “outsourced” warfare.