Raising the Minimum Wage by $1 May Prevent Thousands of Suicides

Why Was an Alleged Rape Victim Convicted for Lying? ; Will Alleged CIA Misbehavior Set Julian Assange Free? ; and More Picks

minimum wage, depression, suicide
The author writes, “A new study suggests that raising the minimum wage might lower the suicide rate — especially when unemployment is high — and that doing so might have saved tens of thousands of people from dying by suicide in the last quarter-century. The minimum federal minimum wage is $7.25, though many states have set it higher. Between 1990 and 2015, raising the minimum wage by $1 in each state might have saved more than 27,000 lives, according to a report published [last] week in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.” Photo credit: jseliger2 / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
Reading Time: 2 minutes

PODCAST: Why Was an Alleged Rape Victim Convicted for Lying? (Chris)

From the Guardian: “[Last] week, a British teenager was finally allowed to return home after a Cypriot court handed her a four-month suspended sentence. The student, who cannot be named for legal reasons, had been found guilty of public mischief by claiming she was raped by a group of male Israeli tourists while on holiday in Ayia Napa last July. The verdict led to widespread criticism of both the Cypriot justice system and the judge who heard the case.” 

Will Alleged CIA Misbehavior Set Julian Assange Free? (DonkeyHotey)

The author writes, “A few days before Christmas, Julian Assange testified to a Spanish court that a Spanish security company, UC Global S.L., acting in coordination with the CIA, illegally recorded all his actions and conversations, including with his lawyers, and streamed them back in real time to the CIA. He will, at the end of February, make a similar complaint to a British extradition court about the CIA’s alleged misbehavior.”

Study Reveals New Possible Strategy for Treating Chronic Pain Due to Burns (Mili)

The author writes, “Treatment of burns normally entails localised treatment at the site of the burn, but this doesn’t address problems that the burn may cause in other parts of the body, such as the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), which is crucial for fully treating the burn and possible neurological complications, such as neuropathic pain. Siraj Patwa and his colleagues at Yale University and the US Department of Veterans Affairs studied spinal cord neurons in a burn injury mouse animal model and found that the skin injury affected the structural connections between neurons.”

He Exposed Nepotism at a California Tax Agency. Then He Lost His Job. (Reader Steve)

The author writes, “Three years ago state Treasurer Fiona Ma asked a California public employee to help uncover wasteful spending and nepotism at a tax agency that was collecting more than $60 billion a year in revenue. Mark DeSio delivered, funneling records to the state auditor, Finance Department and State Personnel Board for what became damning investigations into the California Board of Equalization.”

Networked Up: Cris-Crossing America, Alone and Interconnected (Chris)

From the Baffler: “I’d been on the road for six months, living out of a GMC Savana that was too new for a tape deck and too old for an aux port. I’d gutted the back and bolted a homemade bedframe to the body. I had a camping stove, a water tank, and a small solar generator. I … shaved in Walmart bathrooms, showered at truck stops, and idled in McDonald’s parking lots to play World of Warcraft on stolen Wi-Fi. I worked remotely and circled the country on $1,000 a month.”

Where else do you see journalism of this quality and value?

Please help us do more. Make a tax-deductible contribution now.

Our Comment Policy

Keep it civilized, keep it relevant, keep it clear, keep it short. Please do not post links or promotional material. We reserve the right to edit and to delete comments where necessary.

print

One response to “Raising the Minimum Wage by $1 May Prevent Thousands of Suicides”

  1. Manqueman says:

    1. Any business that can’t afford the modest raise has bigger underlying problems.
    2. There’s no empirical proof of any significant harm from raising the minimum raise to a living wage because…
    3. We’re subsidizing substandard pay because those working for extremely low pay often rely on public assistance.
    Conclusion: There’s absolutely no good, fact-based reason not to raise the minimum to a living wage. (That said, I’d make an exception for young people working part time while in school.)