The Heat Is On. Climate Crisis Calls for Radical Measures.

Driverless Trucking Now a Reality in Sweden ; Should You Tune Out the News? ; and More Picks

Climate crisis, global heat
The author writes, “Drowned cities, stagnant seas, intolerable heatwaves, entire nations uninhabitable … and more than 11 billion humans. A 4-degree-warmer world is the stuff of nightmares, and yet that’s where we’re heading in just decades. While governments mull various carbon targets aimed at keeping human-[caused] global heating within safe levels – including new ambitions to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 – it’s worth looking ahead ... at what happens if we fail.” Photo credit: Ivan Pellacani / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Why the US Just Had Its Wettest 12-Month Stretch on Record (Mili)

From Forbes: “Deke Arndt, a climatologist at NOAA’s National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI), tweeted: ‘ … A warmer world turns up the hydrology dial. When we are sent the bill for climate change, it comes in the context of our water.’”

Driverless Electric Truck Starts Deliveries on Swedish Public Road (DonkeyHotey)

From Reuters: “Einride’s T-Pod is 26 tonnes when full and does not have a driver cabin, which it estimates reduces road freight operating costs by around 60 percent versus a diesel truck with a driver.”

Colombia Army’s New Kill Orders Send Chills Down Ranks (Reader Pat)

The author writes, “In a meeting recounted by one of the officers, a general ordered commanders to ‘do anything’ to boost their results, even if it meant ‘allying ourselves’ with armed criminal groups to get information on [guerilla and paramilitary] targets, a divide-and-conquer strategy. Beyond that, officers said, soldiers who increase their combat kills are being offered incentives, like extra vacation.”

Nigerian Prisons Are Teeming With Poor and Unjustly Convicted Inmates (Chris)

The author writes, “Ikoyi Prisons [in Lagos], built for 800 prisoners, currently accommodates about 2900 inmates. A senior government official, who pleaded anonymity, said part of the reasons for the congestion was that law enforcement agencies regularly carry out raids in places inhabited by the poor where people are arrested. He said such people, in most cases, cannot bribe police operatives and they end up being charged to court, sometimes with charges different from their real offences.”

Do We Owe It to Society — and Ourselves — to Tune Out the News? (Russ)

The author writes, “Knowing the news is not an end in itself. It is a means to living a better, fuller life in a healthier, more robust community. If and when our obsessions with news feeds sour life and weaken the community, a citizen’s duty is to tune out — for a healthy hour, day or week. The algorithm can’t control you if you’re not online.”

Where else do you see journalism of this quality and value?

Please help us do more. Make a tax-deductible contribution now.

Our Comment Policy

Keep it civilized, keep it relevant, keep it clear, keep it short. Please do not post links or promotional material. We reserve the right to edit and to delete comments where necessary.

print

Comments are closed.