RadioWhoWhatWhy: Should We All Become Whistleblowers?

Reading Time: 1 minute In his work on leadership for both government and corporations, Ira Chaleff has become something of an expert on followers. What he’s found—and what he argues in his book Intelligent Disobedience and in his conversation with WhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman—is that we have to learn not to be so quick to follow orders and accept authority.

Chaleff explores how a remarkable range of wrongdoing of all magnitudes—from financial fraud to war crimes, and even, surprisingly, sexual misconduct—can to some degree trace back to the compromised moral compass of those too quick to comply with orders. While we may not all have it in us to become whistleblowers, says Chaleff, we can all stand to be a bit more disobedient—when it is warranted.

The Whistleblower’s Dilemma: Loyalty vs. Moral Obligation

Reading Time: 1 minute Whistleblowers are often ostracized for their willingness to speak out against corruption and unchecked power. What is it in human nature that’s so scared of transparency and truth? RadioWhoWhatWhy’s Jeff Schechtman speaks with former whistleblower Wendy Addison, recognized for bringing attention to massive corruption at a major South African company and now outspoken supporter of whistleblowers worldwide.

After $40 Billion, America’s Biggest Nuclear Dump Is Still Leaking

Reading Time: 5 minutes Begun in 1989, America’s biggest radioactive contamination waste site—run by the Department of Energy—has cost taxpayers roughly $40 billion so far and may take another 40 years and an additional $100 billion before the cleanup is done, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. And critics argue workers are getting sick while waste is still leaking.