CLOSE READING: The Saudis, a Twitter Investment, and the End of Arab Spring?

Recently, Twitter announced it would restrict tweets in countries where the government declares the tweets illegal. That troubling announcement was treated by the American media as a blip. But is it a blip? Or is it a crisis for freedom everywhere? And did a huge investment in Twitter by a Saudi prince have anything to do with the move?

So Pa, So Good…But Must Activists Always Align With Corporations to Win?

It’s possible to get Congress to spin on a dime—but only a corporate dime. An alliance between tech companies and activists seems to have scared off, at least temporarily, a threat of ‘net censorship. But how do we get elected officials to do the right thing when corporate entities aren’t on the public side?

WORTH READING: The Censorship Business, US Still Segregated, Don’t Shoot (Your Camera)!, No Cars Allowed

The Censorship Business You may have heard how the revolutions across the Middle East were spurred by Facebook and Twitter. You probably also know that the governments blocked these websites to counter the protestors. But you probably didn’t know that the technology used to censor these sites comes from US based company McAfee. Read more Read More

Worth Reading: English Lessons, Very Rich, Legal Murder, Chinese Wall

With the recent events in the Middle East and the union busting in Wisconsin, Americans can learn something useful about fighting back from our neighbors across the pond. In the UK, a group of ordinary citizens decided to disrupt business as usual: By spreading the word on Twitter and holding nation-wide protests of the largest cell phone provider Vodafone, they demanded the company pay up for billions in taxes owed.